New Book: An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) Using QGIS And R

12 Nov

We are pleased to accounce the publication of ‘An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) Using QGIS And R’. This is second book in our new ‘GIS For Biologists Workbooks’ series, which has been created to accompany ‘GIS For Biologists: A Practcial Introduction For Undergraduates‘.

To purchase it from Amazon.com, click here. To purchase it from Amazon.co.uk, click here. It is also avaiable to order through all good book shops and other online stockists.

‘An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) Using QGIS’ has been specially written based around free-to-access, open source software. Specifically, it uses two such packages, QGIS for the GIS-based components, and R for statistical analyses. Working with both of these packages, rather than just one or other, allows you to make the most of the specialist tools available within  each of them.

It contains five exercises which will introduce you to the basic spatial processing and analytical techniques required to create a biologically meaningful species distribution model (SDM). Taken together, these exercises allow you to work through an example of an SDM from processing your survey data and making raster data layers of environmental variables to constructing an SDM, visualising its predicted spatial distribution and validating its predictive ability. The exercises  are designed to be followed in the order they are presented, and work with a specific data set which is available to download from the link provided.

Working through these five exercises will help the user obtain experience in creating SDM using QGIS and R, and provide them with the confidence to apply these skills to their own research. These exercises are presented in the same easy-to-follow flow diagram-based format used in ‘GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates’. They are accompanied by images which show the user how their GIS project should look as they progress through the exercises, allowing them to compare their own work to the expected results.

Note: An earlier version of this book based around ArcGIS was previously published under the title ‘An Introduction To Using GIS In MArine Biology: Supplementary Workbook Three’.

The PSLS series of books uses Task-Oriented Learning (TOL) to teach the practical application of research skills to the life sciences. This involves demonstrating how these skills can be used in the specific circumstances in which they are likely to be required rather than concentrating on teaching theoretical frameworks or on teaching skills in a generic or abstract manner. By seeing how the similar processes are used to achieve a variety of different goals within a specific field, it becomes easier for the reader to identify the general rules behind the practical application of these processes and, therefore, to transfer them to novel situations they may encounter in the future.

New Book: An Introduction To Integrating QGIS And R For Spatial Analysis

8 Nov

We are pleased to accounce the publication of our latest GIS book. This is ‘An Introduction To Integrating QGIS And R For Spatial Analysis’. This is the first volume in our new ‘GIS For Biologists Workbooks’ series, which has been created to accompany ‘GIS For Biologists: A Practcial Introduction For Undergraduates‘.

To purchase it from Amazon.com, click here. To purchase it from Amazon.co.uk, click here. It is also avaiable to order through all good book shops and other online stockists.

‘An Introduction To Integrating QGIS And R For Spatial Analysis’ has been specially written based around free-to-access, open source software. Specifically, it uses two such packages, QGIS for the GIS-based components, and R for statistical analyses. Working with both of these packages, rather than just one or other, allows you to make the most of the specialist tools available within each of them.

It contains five exercises which demonstrate how to integrate QGIS and R to allow you to conduct high quality spatial analyses by accessing and combining the powerful mapping, data layer creation, editing and processing tools from QGIS and the equally powerful analytical tools from R. These exercises are based around data from a real biological field study and include: creating a GIS project to process your data and create a map suitable for publication; creating environmental raster data layers; linking environmental data to biological data and creating graphs from the resulting data set; and running statistical analyses (GLMs and GAMs) to investigate spatial relationships in this combined data set.

Working through these five exercises will help the user obtain experience in integrating QGIS and R for spatial analysis, and provide them with the confidence to apply these skills to their own research. These exercises are presented in the same easy-to-follow flow diagram-based format used in ‘GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates’. They are accompanied by images which show the user how their spatial analysis project should look as they progress through the exercises, allowing them to compare their own work to the expected results.

The PSLS series of books uses Task-Oriented Learning (TOL) to teach the practical application of research skills to the life sciences. This involves demonstrating how these skills can be used in the specific circumstances in which they are likely to be required rather than concentrating on teaching theoretical frameworks or on teaching skills in a generic or abstract manner. By seeing how the similar processes are used to achieve a variety of different goals within a specific field, it becomes easier for the reader to identify the general rules behind the practical application of these processes and, therefore, to transfer them to novel situations they may encounter in the future.

First Call: GIS Training Courses January 2020 – ‘An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research’ and ‘An Introdution To Species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment’

7 Nov

This is the first call for attendees for our upcoming GIS training courses in January 2020. These courses are An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research and An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In he Marine Environment. They will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, between the 27th and 30th of January 2020.

 

1. An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research, Glasgow, Scotland, 27th – 28th January 2020:

This introductory training course for those who wish to learn how to use GIS in any area of biological research, and it will provide an introduction to using GIS in a wide variety of biological research situations ranging from the basics of making maps through to studying the spread of diseases and creating maps of species biodiversity. It will consist of a series of background sessions on using GIS mixed in with practical sessions where you will work directly with GIS software to complete various tasks which biological researchers commonly need to be able to do.

The course will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, and it will be taught by Dr Colin D. MacLeod, who has more than 15 years experience in using GIS for a wide variety of biological purposes. For those who cannot attend this course in person, a shorter online course based on the same materials is available from our sister site www.GISforBiologists.com.

The course will primarily be based around QGIS (also known as Quantum GIS), which provides a user-friendly, open-source, free alternative to commercial GIS software packages, and it is becoming increasingly widely used in both academic and commercial organisations  As a result, it is aimed at both those with no GIS experience, but wish to learn how to do GIS with QGIS, and also those who are familiar with using commercial GIS software, such as ArcGIS, but who wish to learn how to use QGIS as an alternative. However, this course is taught using software-independent approach, and it is also open to those who wish to learn how to use ArcGIS to do biological GIS. The practical exercises on this course will be based on those in the recently published GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates  by Dr MacLeod, and a free copy of this book will be provided to all participants.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://gisinecology.com/an-introduction-to-using-gis-in-biological-research/ or email info@GISinEcology.com.

 

2. An Introduction To species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment, Glasgow, Scotland, 29th – 30th January 2020:

This two day course follows on from the introductory GIS course and provides all the information required to start using Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) in the marine environment in a practical and biologically meaningful way. In a series of background sessions, case studies and practical exercises, it covers how to create data layers of species distribution, how to select and create raster data layers of environmental variables, such as water depth, how to join information on species distribution to environmental information, how to export data from a GIS project for analysis in a statistical package, such as R, how to create spatial visualisations based on a statistical model and how to validate the spatial predictions of a model. The practical sessions work through a species distribution modelling project based on real marine survey data from start to finish. This course can be done with a combination of QGIS and R (our recommended option) or  comnbination of ArcGIS and R.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://www.gisinecology.com/an-inroduction-to-species-distribution-modelling-in-the-marine-environment/ or email: cdmacleod@GISinEcology.com. Note: This course requires a basic knowledge of GIS (as covered in the above introductory GIS course) and how to use ArcGIS or QGIS GIS software.

 

Both these courses will be held at the Mackintosh at the Willow, 215 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3EX, Scotland. Glasgow has great transport links and is within half a days travel by car or by fast train links from most cities in the UK. For example, it can be reached in as little as 4h 30mins from London by train. It can also be reached by direct flights from many European cities and the flight time is generally under four hours.

Attendees will be responsible for their own accommodation. However, Glasgow provides a wide range of accommodation options to fit most budgets.

Final Call: GIS Training Courses July 2019 – ‘An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research’ and ‘An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment’

4 Jul

This is the final call for attendees for our upcoming GIS training courses in July 2019. These courses are An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research and An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In he Marine Environment. They will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, between the 29th of July 2019 and 1st of August 2019.

 

1. An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research, Glasgow, Scotland, 29th – 30th July 2019:

This introductory training course for those who wish to learn how to use GIS in any area of biological research, and it will provide an introduction to using GIS in a wide variety of biological research situations ranging from the basics of making maps through to studying the spread of diseases and creating maps of species biodiversity. It will consist of a series of background sessions on using GIS mixed in with practical sessions where you will work directly with GIS software to complete various tasks which biological researchers commonly need to be able to do.

The course will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, and it will be taught by Dr Colin D. MacLeod, who has more than 15 years experience in using GIS for a wide variety of biological purposes. For those who cannot attend this course in person, a shorter online course based on the same materials is available from our sister site www.GISforBiologists.com.

The course will primarily be based around QGIS (also known as Quantum GIS), which provides a user-friendly, open-source, free alternative to commercial GIS software packages, and it is becoming increasingly widely used in both academic and commercial organisations  As a result, it is aimed at both those with no GIS experience, but wish to learn how to do GIS with QGIS, and also those who are familiar with using commercial GIS software, such as ArcGIS, but who wish to learn how to use QGIS as an alternative. However, this course is taught using software-independent approach, and it is also open to those who wish to learn how to use ArcGIS to do biological GIS. The practical exercises on this course will be based on those in the recently published GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates  by Dr MacLeod, and a free copy of this book will be provided to all participants.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://gisinecology.com/an-introduction-to-using-gis-in-biological-research/ or email info@GISinEcology.com.

 

2. An Introduction To species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment, Glasgow, Scotland, 31st July – 1st August 2019:

This two day course follows on from the introductory GIS course and provides all the information required to start using Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) in the marine environment in a practical and biologically meaningful way. In a series of background sessions, case studies and practical exercises, it covers how to create data layers of species distribution, how to select and create raster data layers of environmental variables, such as water depth, how to join information on species distribution to environmental information, how to export data from a GIS project for analysis in a statistical package, such as R, how to create spatial visualisations based on a statistical model and how to validate the spatial predictions of a model. The practical sessions work through a species distribution modelling project based on real marine survey data from start to finish. This course can be done with either QGIS (our recommended option) or ArcGIS.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://www.gisinecology.com/an-inroduction-to-species-distribution-modelling-in-the-marine-environment/ or email: cdmacleod@GISinEcology.com. Note: This course requires a basic knowledge of GIS (as covered in the above introductory GIS course) and how to use ArcGIS or QGIS GIS software.

 

Both these courses will be held at the Mackintosh at the Willow, 215 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3EX, Scotland. Glasgow has great transport links and is within half a days travel by car or by fast train links from most cities in the UK. For example, it can be reached in as little as 4h 30mins from London by train. It can also be reached by direct flights from many European cities and the flight time is generally under four hours.

Attendees will be responsible for their own accommodation. However, Glasgow provides a wide range of accommodation options to fit most budgets.

Second Call: GIS Training Courses July 2019 – ‘An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research’ and ‘An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment’

12 Jun

This is the second call for attendees for our upcoming GIS training courses in July 2019. These courses are An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research and An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In he Marine Environment. They will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, between the 29th of July 2019 and 1st of August 2019.

 

1. An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research, Glasgow, Scotland, 29th – 30th July 2019:

This introductory training course for those who wish to learn how to use GIS in any area of biological research, and it will provide an introduction to using GIS in a wide variety of biological research situations ranging from the basics of making maps through to studying the spread of diseases and creating maps of species biodiversity. It will consist of a series of background sessions on using GIS mixed in with practical sessions where you will work directly with GIS software to complete various tasks which biological researchers commonly need to be able to do.

The course will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, and it will be taught by Dr Colin D. MacLeod, who has more than 15 years experience in using GIS for a wide variety of biological purposes. For those who cannot attend this course in person, a shorter online course based on the same materials is available from our sister site www.GISforBiologists.com.

The course will primarily be based around QGIS (also known as Quantum GIS), which provides a user-friendly, open-source, free alternative to commercial GIS software packages, and it is becoming increasingly widely used in both academic and commercial organisations  As a result, it is aimed at both those with no GIS experience, but wish to learn how to do GIS with QGIS, and also those who are familiar with using commercial GIS software, such as ArcGIS, but who wish to learn how to use QGIS as an alternative. However, this course is taught using software-independent approach, and it is also open to those who wish to learn how to use ArcGIS to do biological GIS. The practical exercises on this course will be based on those in the recently published GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates  by Dr MacLeod, and a free copy of this book will be provided to all participants.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://gisinecology.com/an-introduction-to-using-gis-in-biological-research/ or email info@GISinEcology.com.

 

2. An Introduction To species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment, Glasgow, Scotland, 31st July – 1st August 2019:

This two day course follows on from the introductory GIS course and provides all the information required to start using Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) in the marine environment in a practical and biologically meaningful way. In a series of background sessions, case studies and practical exercises, it covers how to create data layers of species distribution, how to select and create raster data layers of environmental variables, such as water depth, how to join information on species distribution to environmental information, how to export data from a GIS project for analysis in a statistical package, such as R, how to create spatial visualisations based on a statistical model and how to validate the spatial predictions of a model. The practical sessions work through a species distribution modelling project based on real marine survey data from start to finish. This course can be done with either QGIS (our recommended option) or ArcGIS.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://www.gisinecology.com/an-inroduction-to-species-distribution-modelling-in-the-marine-environment/ or email: cdmacleod@GISinEcology.com. Note: This course requires a basic knowledge of GIS (as covered in the above introductory GIS course) and how to use ArcGIS or QGIS GIS software.

 

Both these courses will be held at the Mackintosh at the Willow, 215 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3EX, Scotland. Glasgow has great transport links and is within half a days travel by car or by fast train links from most cities in the UK. For example, it can be reached in as little as 4h 30mins from London by train. It can also be reached by direct flights from many European cities and the flight time is generally under four hours.

Attendees will be responsible for their own accommodation. However, Glasgow provides a wide range of accommodation options to fit most budgets.

First Call: GIS Training Courses July 2019 – ‘An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research’ and ‘An Introdution To Species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment’

1 May

This is the first call for attendees for our upcoming GIS training courses in July 2019. These courses are An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research and An Introduction To Species Distribution Modelling In he Marine Environment. They will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, between the 29th of July 2019 and 1st of August 2019.

 

1. An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research, Glasgow, Scotland, 29th – 30th July 2019:

This introductory training course for those who wish to learn how to use GIS in any area of biological research, and it will provide an introduction to using GIS in a wide variety of biological research situations ranging from the basics of making maps through to studying the spread of diseases and creating maps of species biodiversity. It will consist of a series of background sessions on using GIS mixed in with practical sessions where you will work directly with GIS software to complete various tasks which biological researchers commonly need to be able to do.

The course will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, and it will be taught by Dr Colin D. MacLeod, who has more than 15 years experience in using GIS for a wide variety of biological purposes. For those who cannot attend this course in person, a shorter online course based on the same materials is available from our sister site www.GISforBiologists.com.

The course will primarily be based around QGIS (also known as Quantum GIS), which provides a user-friendly, open-source, free alternative to commercial GIS software packages, and it is becoming increasingly widely used in both academic and commercial organisations  As a result, it is aimed at both those with no GIS experience, but wish to learn how to do GIS with QGIS, and also those who are familiar with using commercial GIS software, such as ArcGIS, but who wish to learn how to use QGIS as an alternative. However, this course is taught using software-independent approach, and it is also open to those who wish to learn how to use ArcGIS to do biological GIS. The practical exercises on this course will be based on those in the recently published GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates  by Dr MacLeod, and a free copy of this book will be provided to all participants.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://gisinecology.com/an-introduction-to-using-gis-in-biological-research/ or email info@GISinEcology.com.

 

2. An Introduction To species Distribution Modelling In The Marine Environment, Glasgow, Scotland, 31st July – 1st August 2019:

This two day course follows on from the introductory GIS course and provides all the information required to start using Species Distribution Modelling (SDM) in the marine environment in a practical and biologically meaningful way. In a series of background sessions, case studies and practical exercises, it covers how to create data layers of species distribution, how to select and create raster data layers of environmental variables, such as water depth, how to join information on species distribution to environmental information, how to export data from a GIS project for analysis in a statistical package, such as R, how to create spatial visualisations based on a statistical model and how to validate the spatial predictions of a model. The practical sessions work through a species distribution modelling project based on real marine survey data from start to finish. This course can be done with either QGIS (our recommended option) or ArcGIS.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://www.gisinecology.com/an-inroduction-to-species-distribution-modelling-in-the-marine-environment/ or email: cdmacleod@GISinEcology.com. Note: This course requires a basic knowledge of GIS (as covered in the above introductory GIS course) and how to use ArcGIS or QGIS GIS software.

 

Both these courses will be held at the Mackintosh at the Willow, 215 Sauchiehall St, Glasgow G2 3EX, Scotland. Glasgow has great transport links and is within half a days travel by car or by fast train links from most cities in the UK. For example, it can be reached in as little as 4h 30mins from London by train. It can also be reached by direct flights from many European cities and the flight time is generally under four hours.

Attendees will be responsible for their own accommodation. However, Glasgow provides a wide range of accommodation options to fit most budgets.

Second Call: An Introduction To Using GIS/QGIS In Biological Research, Glasgow, 18-19 March 2019

14 Jan

This is the second call for attendees for our upcoming introductory training course for those who wish to learn how to use GIS in biological research, and it will provide an introduction to using GIS in a wide variety of biological research situations ranging from the basics of making maps through to studying the spread of diseases and creating maps of species biodiversity. It will consist of a series of background sessions on using GIS mixed in with practical sessions where you will work directly with GIS software to complete various tasks which biological researchers commonly need to be able to do.

The course will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, on the 18th and 19th of March 2019 and it will be taught by Dr Colin D. MacLeod, who has more than 15 years experience in using GIS for a wide variety of biological purposes. For those who cannot attend this course in person, a shorter online course based on the same materials is available from our sister site www.GISforBiologists.com.

The course will primarily be based around QGIS (also known as Quantum GIS), which provides a user-friendly, open-source, free alternative to commercial GIS software packages, and it is becoming increasingly widely used in both academic and commercial organisations As a result, it is aimed at both those with no GIS experience, but wish to learn how to do GIS with QGIS, and also those who are familiar with using commercial GIS software, such as ArcGIS, but who wish to learn how to use QGIS as an alternative. However, this course is taught using software-independent approach, and it is also open to those who wish to learn how to use ArcGIS to do biological GIS.

The practical exercises on this course will be based on those in the recently published GIS For Biologists: A Practical Introduction For Undergraduates by Dr MacLeod, and a free copy of this book will be provided to all participants.

Attendance will be limited to a maximum of 16 people, and the course will cost £295 per person (£200 for students, the unwaged and those working for registered charities). To book a place, or for more information, visit http://gisinecology.com/an-introduction-to-using-gis-in-biological-research/ or email info@GISinEcology.com.

Glasgow has great transport links and is within half a days travel by car or by fast train links from most cities in the UK. For example, it can be reached in as little as 4h 30mins from London by train. It can also be reached by direct flights from many European cities and the flight time is generally under four hours.

The exact venue for the course will be confirmed closer to the time of the course, but it will be held in Glasgow city centre.

Attendees will be responsible for their own accommodation. However, Glasgow provides a wide range of accommodation options to fit most budgets.